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Letter from Philip Harry and Dr. John Harry

JH04-02.pdf

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Long ... I presume you have both received my letter of the twenty second October and have seen Mr. Kendall who was a bearer of it. I sincerely pray that he may have had a safe passage. He will be able far better than me to answer all your inquiries respecting the Nature and capabilities of this Province. Of one thing I must, however, beg? to warn you - and that without the slightest inspiration on Mr. Kendall's word and character, which are those of a gentleman and a man of honour - and without abating one iota of love and respect I bear him for his uniform kindness & gentlemanly treatment - he is sanguine,  and views things in a lights which some might call too favorable, tho' it may  be my own saturnine temperament induces me to think so more than I should otherwise. Of course, it is not within the compass of a letter to give anything but a superficial, rambling recount of a country abounding in resources like the one I inhabit - but I will set down my observations as they come upp... Nova Scotia was settled much earlier than New Brunswick, and the French had considerable & important towns abode in this Province. To this is owing the greater extent of its cultivating lands, and the more in pr... state of Nova Scotian husbandry. Again - as you very properly remark -  New Bk counts the Lumber Trade among its principle and actually available resources - whereas her sister Province is nearly exhausted of timber. (Pine, Birch, ... and some Cedar supply the Market). Other woods are not much thought of .
 
Long ... I presume you have both received my letter of the twenty second October and have seen Mr. Kendall who was a bearer of it. I sincerely pray that he may have had a safe passage. He will be able far better than me to answer all your inquiries respecting the Nature and capabilities of this Province. Of one thing I must, however, beg? to warn you - and that without the slightest inspiration on Mr. Kendall's word and character, which are those of a gentleman and a man of honour - and without abating one iota of love and respect I bear him for his uniform kindness & gentlemanly treatment - he is sanguine,  and views things in a lights which some might call too favorable, tho' it may  be my own saturnine temperament induces me to think so more than I should otherwise. Of course, it is not within the compass of a letter to give anything but a superficial, rambling recount of a country abounding in resources like the one I inhabit - but I will set down my observations as they come upp... Nova Scotia was settled much earlier than New Brunswick, and the French had considerable & important towns abode in this Province. To this is owing the greater extent of its cultivating lands, and the more in pr... state of Nova Scotian husbandry. Again - as you very properly remark -  New Bk counts the Lumber Trade among its principle and actually available resources - whereas her sister Province is nearly exhausted of timber. (Pine, Birch, ... and some Cedar supply the Market). Other woods are not much thought of .
  
The rage for Land, speculation (last summer) which possessed the yankees and others, had almost wholly
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The rage for Land, speculation (last summer) which possessed the yankees and others, had almost wholly ... to timber and mill-sites. For saw-mills, New Brunswick is most peculiarly  adopted. Her rivers are all very rapid, and generally (in greater part of their ....) flowing without high banks - so the dams are thrown across with the greatest ease, and water is so plentiful that there is no chance of a deficiency of power on that score.  The works of their mills are entirely of wood - very simple &

Revision as of Nov 19, 2015, 1:45:05 PM

January 15, 1836 Fredericton

My Dear Uncle,

Long ... I presume you have both received my letter of the twenty second October and have seen Mr. Kendall who was a bearer of it. I sincerely pray that he may have had a safe passage. He will be able far better than me to answer all your inquiries respecting the Nature and capabilities of this Province. Of one thing I must, however, beg? to warn you - and that without the slightest inspiration on Mr. Kendall's word and character, which are those of a gentleman and a man of honour - and without abating one iota of love and respect I bear him for his uniform kindness & gentlemanly treatment - he is sanguine, and views things in a lights which some might call too favorable, tho' it may be my own saturnine temperament induces me to think so more than I should otherwise. Of course, it is not within the compass of a letter to give anything but a superficial, rambling recount of a country abounding in resources like the one I inhabit - but I will set down my observations as they come upp... Nova Scotia was settled much earlier than New Brunswick, and the French had considerable & important towns abode in this Province. To this is owing the greater extent of its cultivating lands, and the more in pr... state of Nova Scotian husbandry. Again - as you very properly remark - New Bk counts the Lumber Trade among its principle and actually available resources - whereas her sister Province is nearly exhausted of timber. (Pine, Birch, ... and some Cedar supply the Market). Other woods are not much thought of .

The rage for Land, speculation (last summer) which possessed the yankees and others, had almost wholly ... to timber and mill-sites. For saw-mills, New Brunswick is most peculiarly adopted. Her rivers are all very rapid, and generally (in greater part of their ....) flowing without high banks - so the dams are thrown across with the greatest ease, and water is so plentiful that there is no chance of a deficiency of power on that score. The works of their mills are entirely of wood - very simple &